04 Dec

Community Service Learning Within Open * Communities

As the name implies, “service-learning is an educational approach that combines learning objectives with community service in order to provide a pragmatic, progressive learning experience while meeting societal needs” (Wikipedia).  When you add the “community” part to that definition it changes to, “about leadership development as well as traditional information and skill acquisition” (Janet 1999).

How does this apply to Open * communities?

Simple!  Community service learning is an ideal way to get middle/high school/college students to get involved within the various communities and understand the power of Open *. And also to stay active after their term of community service learning.

This idea came to me just today (as of writing, Nov. 30th) as a thought on what is really Open *.  Not the straightforward definition of it but the the affect Open * creates.  As I stated on my home page of my site, Open * creates a sense of empowerment.  One way is through the actions that create skills and improvements to those skills.  Which skills are those?  Mozilla Learning made a map and description to these skills on their Web Literacy pages.  They are show below also:

screenshot-from-2016-11-30-19-07-22Most of these skills along with the ways to gain these skills (read, write, participate) can be used as skills to worked on for community service learning.

As stated above, community service learning is really the focus of gaining skills and leadership skills while (in the Open * sense) contribute to projects that impacts the society of the world.  This is really needed now as there are many local and world issues that Open * can provide solutions too.

I see this as an outreach program for schools and the various organizations/groups such as Ubuntu, System76, Mozilla, and even Linux Padawan.  Unlike Google Summer of Code (GSoC), no one receives a stipend but the idea of having a mentor could be taken from GSoC.  No, not could but should.  Because the student needs someone to guide them, hence Linux Padawan could benefit from this idea.

Having that said, I will try to work out a sample program that could be used and maybe test it with Linux Padawan.  Maybe I could have this ready by spring semester.

Random Fact #1: Simon Quigley, through his middle school, is in a way already doing this type of learning.

Random Fact #2: At one point of time, I wanted to translate that Web Literacy map into one that can be applied to Open *, not just one topic.

15 Mar

Be My Patreon!

Like many people who create things, I joined the Patreon bandwagon.  If anyone doesn’t want donate this way, please tell me so I can set up a Paypal account for other donations.

Hopefully,  Patreon and the money can help me while I job seek for a job witjhin the biology/chemistry lab tech world and also motivate me into building the Ubuntu Community and maybe branch out.

EDIT: I fixed the link, sorry about that. 😛

08 Dec

Open * Communities Foundation/Network Idea

NOTE: I know this is offtopic for the Planets that my blog is linked to, but I wanted to get the idea cross to a larger audience.

This idea for a foundation/network/or whatever that focus on the Open * community movement. I don’t know if there is a such a movement or how strong the movement if it exists. What I only know is that Linux Foundation does focus on building Open Source communities.  Or from what I heard from Jono Bacon…

The idea is to create a foundation/network that can focus on the core values as below:

The Core Values of an Open * Community

    • collaboration NOT competition
    • commitment
    • sense of community
    • empowerment
    • And more…

I also intend to include projects (within the foundation/network) such as mentoring, collection of material, advocacy, ect.  Open Badges is another project/idea that I want to try.

My plan to start this is to use Kickstarter or Indiegogo for the startup and maybe Patreon to keep the funds going (I feel like something with be created).  I also know that I will work on networking with other organizations within the Open * world for funding and also members and advisors for the board that will make up the governance.  The plan for the board is to have one (or maybe two) community leaders from each Open * movement/group.

I’m planning to start working on the details and getting them out by the end of this month/year via my blog.  The crowdfunding campaign will most likely start next year.

I hope I can get this idea started or if there is such a group/org, I can get myself working with them to create better Open * Communities.

17 Nov

Where’s Me Support?!

Over the two (2+) plus years, I started many projects within the Open * communities that I’m apart of. Most of these projects I started were meant to be worked on with two or more people (including me, of course) but I never had luck in getting anyone to work together with me. Okay, once it has succeeded and two (2) or three (3) times, it was close but still failed. That one time when it succeeded happened because I was on the Membership Board where the members had to be committed.

Because many projects meant for collaboration failed that means either that the communities don’t have enough people willing to work with me (or on anything!) (or a time commitment) or I have networking issues. The latter is within my control and the earlier is one of the problems that most of the Open * communities face.

Lacking support and the feeling of not getting things done over these two plus years is making me to lose motivation to volunteer within these communities. In fact, some of this has already affected four teams within the Ubuntu Community: Ubuntu Women, Ubuntu Ohio, Ubuntu Leadership Team, and Ubuntu Scientists and no news or any activity is shown. As for others, I’m close in removing myself from the communities, something that I don’t want to do and this is why I wrote this. It’s to answer my question of: Where’s my support?! (“me” in the title, but it’s for the lightheartedness that this post needs) I know of a few that maybe feeling this also.

As a thought, as I wrote this post, is what if I worked on a site that could serve as a volunteer board for projects within the Open * communities. Something like “Find a Task” started by Mozilla (I think) and brought over to the Ubuntu Community by Ian W, but maybe as a Discourse forum or Stack Exchange. The only problem that I will face is, again, support for people who want to post and to read. I had issues getting Open Science groups/bloggers/people to add their blog’s feed to Planet Open Science hosted by OKFN’s Open Science But that might be different if it will have almost all types of Open * movements will be represented. Who knows.

Readers, please don’t worry, as this post is written during the CC election in the Ubuntu Community, it will not affect my will to run for a chair. In fact, I think, being in the CC could help me to learn to deal with this issue if others are facing this but they are afraid to talk about in public.

I really, really don’t want to leave any of the Open Communities because of lack of support and I hope some of you can understand and help me. I would like your feedback/comments/advice on this one.

Thank you.

P.S. If this sounded like a rant, sorry, I had to get it out.

20 Oct

Open * Communities Mindmap

As a brainstorm today (and also for my research), I created an insanely large, almost impossible to read/follow mindmap mapping what is there in the Open * communities and hopefully what should/could be focused on when developing communities:

Open_CommunitiesMindMap

I broke up the sub-items with each major item by Open Source and Non-Open Source.  To me, I think there is some difference in those two communities in how are things are done and what is the focus.

There are two things that I forgot on this map:

  • Meta Documentation (under tools for both Open Source and Non-Open Source)
  • Barrier to Entry (under problems for both)
14 Sep

Starting Research: Looking at Building A Successful Non-Technical Open * Community

After a bunch of unsuccessful attempts of trying to get some sort of project going within a Open Science community, I decided to start research on how to build a successful non-technical Open * community.  I’m aware that could be just be a matter of time commitment but I still think it be worth it to learn how to build one.

I started a public project on the Open Science Framework.  Most of my work done (so far) is in the wiki of the Project.  Right now, this plan is the one that I will follow.   At the moment, it looks like that I will be focusing on the things that I learned/used/experienced from the Ubuntu Community, but it may expend into other topics.

I’m also planning to use Open Undergrad Research Foundation (OpenURF) to set up a experiment to see which tools are needed and how to use them.  But that will be later as the sever guy haven’t e-mail me back.

I will be using my blog for updates.

Afterthought: I really think it may be just be a matter of time commitment or not enough drivers.  If that is the case, then I will start new research on how to fix that, if possible.