04 Dec

Community Service Learning Within Open * Communities

As the name implies, “service-learning is an educational approach that combines learning objectives with community service in order to provide a pragmatic, progressive learning experience while meeting societal needs” (Wikipedia).  When you add the “community” part to that definition it changes to, “about leadership development as well as traditional information and skill acquisition” (Janet 1999).

How does this apply to Open * communities?

Simple!  Community service learning is an ideal way to get middle/high school/college students to get involved within the various communities and understand the power of Open *. And also to stay active after their term of community service learning.

This idea came to me just today (as of writing, Nov. 30th) as a thought on what is really Open *.  Not the straightforward definition of it but the the affect Open * creates.  As I stated on my home page of my site, Open * creates a sense of empowerment.  One way is through the actions that create skills and improvements to those skills.  Which skills are those?  Mozilla Learning made a map and description to these skills on their Web Literacy pages.  They are show below also:

screenshot-from-2016-11-30-19-07-22Most of these skills along with the ways to gain these skills (read, write, participate) can be used as skills to worked on for community service learning.

As stated above, community service learning is really the focus of gaining skills and leadership skills while (in the Open * sense) contribute to projects that impacts the society of the world.  This is really needed now as there are many local and world issues that Open * can provide solutions too.

I see this as an outreach program for schools and the various organizations/groups such as Ubuntu, System76, Mozilla, and even Linux Padawan.  Unlike Google Summer of Code (GSoC), no one receives a stipend but the idea of having a mentor could be taken from GSoC.  No, not could but should.  Because the student needs someone to guide them, hence Linux Padawan could benefit from this idea.

Having that said, I will try to work out a sample program that could be used and maybe test it with Linux Padawan.  Maybe I could have this ready by spring semester.

Random Fact #1: Simon Quigley, through his middle school, is in a way already doing this type of learning.

Random Fact #2: At one point of time, I wanted to translate that Web Literacy map into one that can be applied to Open *, not just one topic.

20 Nov

Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day 2016

It’s that time of the year where we appreciate the members of our Ubuntu Community, Member or not.

This year I appreciate a group of people and three others.  The group is the one that gone to Ohio Linux Fest this year.  I thank you for all of the fun!

The first person that I appreciate is for his Tweet about me (which explains everything why I choose him), which is  Benjamin Kerensa:

The second person is Simon Quigley who is quite an awesome kid.  Over the last year, he has really changed his attitude and even his behavior where it doesn’t not sound like he is a 14 year-old but older.  Because he is a youngster,  he has a good chance that he will get a job within Open Source, development-wise or anything else.

Last but not least, the last person is Pavel Sayekat. Like Simon, he also has improved and now is helping to get his LoCo, Ubuntu Bangladesh, active again.

Keep it up everyone for making the Community the way it is!

21 Jul

On The State Of Health Of Our LoCos

Over the last year, Miles Sharpe (Kilos on IRC) worked hard on getting the African LoCos united and active again.  Now he is working with two other LoCo’s: ubuntu-bd and ubuntu-pk.

The problem that he found in the ubuntu-bd LoCo is this:

I started with ubuntu-bd and found 3 nicks on the irc channel and no one
responding. There were over 20 applicants waiting for approval on LP. some for 2 years already. So with some help from the LC we found the owner and he came and agreed to get things going again but said those users prefer facebook and later said he was to busy. And their mailing list is for announcements. I am not a fan of mailing lists but find that they are a good way of getting a message out when one has no irc contact with someone. At least the LP applicants are approved now.  He greeted a few times after that and has now withdrawn again, so pavlushka (the failed applicant) has been trying to get things going again.
At times there are 10 nicks in channel and from chatting to them for the last 5 months, I have learned that they aren’t satisfied with the way things are going there.The Ubuntu community spirit is missing.

Taken from here.

And for the ubuntu-pk LoCo:

I then started looking at the ubuntu-pk channel and found it in the same sad state of affairs. After a couple of months an old ubuntu user from pk arrived and was surprised to find any life there and he has been helping regrow the channel. And will apply for Ubuntu membership within a few months. By rights he could have done that years ago imo. But once again the leadership is at fault. Here is his old wiki page
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/shani

Taken from here.

Both of this examples points to one problem: these LoCos are using Facebook instead of IRC/Mailing-Lists.  Two reasons come up to my mind on why: 1)we are in a new age where social media dominates and 2)these are third-world countries and Internet is expensive.  Because of that, the providers give “free” Internet where the users can only access Facebook and Twitter for free.  In turn, these people of these countries don’t have a sense of what the Internet is really is.  This is where Mozilla Learning aims to educate these people.  But we are not Mozilla, we are Ubuntu and this is not our problem.  Our problem is the health of our Community (looking at Memberships mainly), mainly the LoCos.

One solution is like the Ubuntu Forums system for Membership.  But the problem is how to deal with the applications on Facebook and other social media sites.  One solution is using groups, but that still requires the applicants to have a wiki page, sign the CoC, and the other items for Membership.  And who will oversee the process on these social media sites?

Other LoCos are inactive via the Ubuntu Community or even social media.  The Oceania LoCos are examples. I lied, they are using G+, I need a better example.  The problem with these LoCos is how would new comers be able to join and then find out that there is no one to greet them?  Or even help on rebooting the LoCo?  The solution is come and join #ubuntu-locoteams on irc.feenode.net, where we can help you connect with others of your LoCo or to give ideas on how to reboot your LoCo.

The last group of LoCos are LoCos who have members but they are scattered throughout the country/state.  My LoCo, Ubuntu Ohio, is one example.  One solution to the problem is figure out a common meeting spot and date and meet there.

The bottom line here is that we need to rethink our health of our LoCos as they are source of our Ubuntu Members and it’s a way to connect with others in real life.

EDIT TO ADD: Uniting LoCos in the same continent or country (USA for example) is another solution.

15 Mar

Be My Patreon!

Like many people who create things, I joined the Patreon bandwagon.  If anyone doesn’t want donate this way, please tell me so I can set up a Paypal account for other donations.

Hopefully,  Patreon and the money can help me while I job seek for a job witjhin the biology/chemistry lab tech world and also motivate me into building the Ubuntu Community and maybe branch out.

EDIT: I fixed the link, sorry about that. 😛

14 Sep

Starting Research: Looking at Building A Successful Non-Technical Open * Community

After a bunch of unsuccessful attempts of trying to get some sort of project going within a Open Science community, I decided to start research on how to build a successful non-technical Open * community.  I’m aware that could be just be a matter of time commitment but I still think it be worth it to learn how to build one.

I started a public project on the Open Science Framework.  Most of my work done (so far) is in the wiki of the Project.  Right now, this plan is the one that I will follow.   At the moment, it looks like that I will be focusing on the things that I learned/used/experienced from the Ubuntu Community, but it may expend into other topics.

I’m also planning to use Open Undergrad Research Foundation (OpenURF) to set up a experiment to see which tools are needed and how to use them.  But that will be later as the sever guy haven’t e-mail me back.

I will be using my blog for updates.

Afterthought: I really think it may be just be a matter of time commitment or not enough drivers.  If that is the case, then I will start new research on how to fix that, if possible.

12 Mar

Center for Open Science Workshop at University of Cincinnati

The main library of university that I go to, University of Cincinnati, hosted a workshop from Center for Open Science on March 12th.  The workshop was over reproducible research practices and how can Open Science help it- mainly with the Center of Open Science’s framework.  Since I’m a (clueless) biology undergrad with barely any research experience, I learned a lot from it and new things, again mainly with their framework.

I heard of the Center and their framework about a year ago and I had no clue of how to test it or even use it for something.  But after this workshop, I think I may have an idea for a personal or a Ubuntu Scientists (or another Open Science group) project to work on improving/teaching documentation for research or another aspect/step of the process.  I also want to figure out how to do outreach also.

12 Feb

Planet Open Science Now Open

In this post, I talked about building a Planet Open Science to collect the various posts from members of the Open Science community and I’m happy to announce that it is ready to use.  I created a thread where those who want to add their feed to the Planet can do so.  You can also use this contact form:

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message

Home page of Planet Open Science

27 Dec

From Intrigued to Interested- What is Need to Get People in a Movement?

In Lou Woodley’s blog, I saw an post about what is needed to sustain a movement.  There was one thing that is missing, at least to me, and that is getting people intrigued about the movement and it’s projects.  One of the easiest ways to get people intrigued is the use of tools that collect information in one place.  Three of tools are:

‘Planet’  Feed Aggregator

Going back to this post, this tool is a good one to collect all of the blog posts from those who have agreed for their posted to be imported via feed reader.  This allows new comers to see what various people are doing within that community and connect with them.

OKFN Open Science working group started to work on one which should be ready to be used in early 2015.

Calendar/Directory

As one tool, this allows new comers to find events and people that are in that community/movement.  The only one example of a possible usage is within the OKFN Open Science working group [1,2] which should be also ready in 2015.

[1] http://discuss.okfn.org/t/open-science-calendar/96

[2] http://discuss.okfn.org/t/open-science-open-knowledge-directory/95

Resource List/Guide

This can be done via a wiki or other ways.  This tool allows new comers to easily see what projects/communities are within that movement.  One example is OARR: Open Access and Reproducible Research Compendium.

There are other tools out there but these are my top ones that should be used to generate more reason to join a movement.


 

Afterthought: I misread the title but I think it might be the same thing (intrigued and interested). I don’t know how I saw it as two different things. Maybe there are as levels.

Update: I told Lou Woodley about my post and she said,

Thanks. I think intrigued is probably the beginning stage of getting interested in something. I’ve been reading a bit about pyramids of engagement and “conversion funnels” recently too and those involve more than three stages, meaning that most stages are not entirely distinct from the previous or following stage.